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Cake Rain.

Give me some sugar

starry-eyed-wolfchild:

THE SERI INDIANS of Sonora Mexico 

Many cultural changes have taken place in the last few decades. Except for special events, women no longer paint their faces as they once did. Those who saw and recorded Seri face painting marked a dying trait.

Women painted delicate and tasteful designs on their faces. Usually, designs were carried in a straight horizontal line across the upper face and over the bridge of the nose. Elements represented flowers, leaves, and other pretty motifs and it was all done just to be attractive.

Married women used distinctive but heavier patterns that identified them as matrons.

Men also painted on occasion-to go to war, for spiritual protection, or just general attraction. Designs suggested by medicine men could be used by any sex for spiritual protection.

(Source: uapress.arizona.edu, via thisiseverydayracism)

“ The problem is that white people see racism as conscious hate, when racism is bigger than that. Racism is a complex system of social and political levers and pulleys set up generations ago to continue working on the behalf of whites at other people’s expense, whether whites know/like it or not. Racism is an insidious cultural disease. It is so insidious that it doesn’t care if you are a white person who likes black people; it’s still going to find a way to infect how you deal with people who don’t look like you. Yes, racism looks like hate, but hate is just one manifestation. Privilege is another. Access is another. Ignorance is another. Apathy is another. And so on. So while I agree with people who say no one is born racist, it remains a powerful system that we’re immediately born into. It’s like being born into air: you take it in as soon as you breathe. It’s not a cold that you can get over. There is no anti-racist certification class. It’s a set of socioeconomic traps and cultural values that are fired up every time we interact with the world. It is a thing you have to keep scooping out of the boat of your life to keep from drowning in it. I know it’s hard work, but it’s the price you pay for owning everything. ”

—    Scott Woods (via newwavefeminism)

(Source: thoughtcatalog.com, via collegecandy)

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